[WORLD PREMIERE] El Pueblo de los Olvidados (The Village of the Forgotten) Part 1

El Pueblo de los Olvidados (The Village of the Forgotten) Part 1, is the dystopian prequel to El Pueblo de los Olvidados (The Village of the Forgotten) Part 2, which premiered at the Chocolate Factory Theater in October 2019. Prompted by research on Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria, this performance by dancemaker Antonio Ramos follows its protagonist, Tony Tacon, who returns to his native planet to discover the country’s devastation under the colonization by an alien species known as FIMA.

El Pueblo de los Olvidados (The Village of the Forgotten) Part 1 is co-commissioned and co-presented with The Chocolate Factory Theater.


ABOUT

Antonio Ramos was born and raised in Puerto Rico where he trained in jazz, salsa and African dance. He later received a B.F.A. in Dance from SUNY Purchase. Antonio began his career, performing with Ballet Theatre of Puerto Rico, Ballet Hispanico of New York, Ballet Concierto and Ballet Municipal (PR). His choreography has been produced at Hostos College; The Kitchen; New York Live Arts; Dance Theater Workshop; SUNY Purchase; BAAD!; Dixon Place,; P.S. 122; Joe’s Pub; Danspace Project; Lexington Center for the Arts NY; DanceNow Downtown; Princeton University; Movement Research; BAX; Galapagos Art and Performance Space; Williamsburg Art Nexus; Fringe Festival 2000 at Theatre La Chappelle; The Painted Bride; Cornell University; and CPR. Recently, he presented work at the American Realness Festival at the Abrons Arts Center, and was commissioned to present the world premiere of his latest work Almodovar Dystopia at Dixon Place in Manhattan. Antonio is also a Licensed Massage Therapist, Zero Balancing and Watsu Practitioner and a certified instructor-practitioner in The Feldenkrais Method. 


FUNDING

The 2019-2020 Season at Abrons Arts Center is supported, in part, by generous grants from the Howard Gilman Foundation, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, the Harkness Foundation for Dance, the Jerome Foundation, the Scherman Foundation, and other generous Henry Street Settlement funders. This program is also supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and support from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Image Credit: Alesia Exum